Interesting! Weird Names of Everyday Things You Never Knew Had Names

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    What’s the name for the smell of nature after rain? Petrichor. The space between your eyebrows? Glabella. Blow your family and friends with this list of names that they never knew actually had named.

    Top 15 Weird Names of Everyday Things:

    Phosphenes

    close eyes
    Via:IrisVision

    Generally, you’ll just see black whenever you close your eyes. But, people sense the sensation of looking bright lights if they close their eyes extremely tight. These bright lights are acknowledged as phosphenes, which mean “to show light.”

    Lunule

    Lunule
    Via: Pinterest

    Some individuals might call them as tips, however, the white, crescent-molded elite part of your nails are indeed called lunules. This name is determined from “lunar,” as the nail sections are carved like crescent moons.

    Petrichor

    Petrichor
    Via: Cool Learnings

    Most of the people are relieved by the pure essence of nature after rain without knowing that there actually is a special smell. This wonderful smell is real and is named petrichor.

    Nurdle

    Nurdle
    Via: FunBuzzTime

    People surmount many hurdles every day, and if they talk to their dentist, formerly they too deal with two or more than two nurdles a day.

    Nurdle is the word used for the small dab of toothpaste you lay on your tooth broom each morning.

    Barm

    beer-foam-header
    Via: VinePair

    Instead of calling “head” or “foam,” you can either annoy or impress your colleagues by adopting the more precise term for the puny bubbles that gather at the top of a beer.

    Barm goes solely to foam that gathers on fermented beverages.

    Zarf

    zarf
    Via: Wikipedia

    Next time you’re calling for a hot drink from Starbucks, be clear to order for a zarf. Know that the right term for this hollow, cardboard barrel is “zarf.”

    Griffonage

    Griffonage
    Via: Twitter

    Griffonage is frequently the most depressing part of someone’s day, specifically for scholars. The term relates to unreadable writing. Admiringly, the importance of writing is encouraging this discomfort to disappear.

    Crapulence

    Crapulence
    Via: Soda-Sherpa

    It’s a dishonor this term isn’t applied more often as it so eloquently sums up what it describes.

    Crapulence is the tired feeling you have after drinking or eating too much. Maybe you can expand your vocab by adopting it in place of “hungover”.

    Lemniscate

    Lemniscate
    Via: Imgur

    You’ll sound great by saying “lemniscate” in place of “figure 8” or “infinity symbol” like everybody else.

    The word is basically evolved from the Latin word for “bow,” as the material is identified for its curviture.

    Ferrule

    Ferrule
    Via: Reidinger.de

    The metal piece that divides the wooden piece of a pencil from the eraser is called as a ferrule.

    Ferrules are any light and small plastic or metal rings needed to conjoin or fasten objects.

    Philtrum

    Philtrum
    Via: Amazetify

    You notice that little slot between your nose and lips? It really has a name.

    In other vertebrates, the philtrum is needed to gather moisture from the mouth to the nose, however, the human being philtrum serves no supposed function.

    Muntins

    Muntins
    Via: schraderandco.com

    Many windows are divided into sections by strips of metal or wood. These window separators are noted as muntins.

    Tittle

    Tittle
    Via: Mye De Leon

    Actually, you aren’t putting a small dot on your lower-case J’s and I’s; you’re putting a tittle on them. That’s true, this dot has a specific name called Tittle.

    Also Read: Know Some Shocking Facts About Prime Minister Of India Narendra Modi

    Aglet

    Aglet
    Via: LaceSpace

    Those plastic materials on the edges of your shoelaces that you perhaps never figure out about are termed as aglets.

    Purlicue

    Purlicue
    Via: Lolwot

    The space between your pointer finger and your thumb is referred to as the purlicue. The word is used in reference to a flourish or curl at the end of a handwritten word.

    So what do you call those plastic materials on the edges of your shoelaces again?