Ashes urn set to tour Australia

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ashes urn

The Ashes urn, the smallest but most curiously contested trophy, will make a rare trip to Australia in 12 years where it will be displayed in Victoria’s State Library’s ‘Velvet, Iron, Ashes’ exhibition from December 2019 up till February 2020.

England will host a five-match series from August 1 to September 16, where Australia will forward to win their first away series on England soil since Aussies won in Steve Waugh captaincy in 2001.

The symbol of cricketing battles between Australia and England, Urn, since it was gifted to the visiting English captain Ivo Bligh at the time of Summer between the time-period of 1882-83, has lived at the MCC Museum at the Lord’s in London irrespective of the result of Test Series.

At the end of each Test series, a replica of the trophy is presented to the winning team.

After coming into MCC’s possession in 1929, it will be only for the third time when the urn has traveled to Australia.

As per the reports of Cricket Australia, during the 1988 bicentennial celebrations of the country, the urn was presented for less than a week and during the three months of 2006-07 Ashes series, six cities were visited.

In 1877, England and Australia played the first Test match at Melbourne. The Ashes came into the picture, following England’s first home defeat in 1882 at The Oval in London.

In 1882-83, during England tour of Australia, a small terracotta urn said to contain the Ashes of a burnt bail and was presented to visiting Captain Ivo Bligh.

After Bligh’s death, the urn was passed on to MCC and has remained there as a symbol of Anglo-Australian cricket dominance. Since the 1998-99 series, The winning Ashes Captain has been given a Waterford Crystal replica commissioned by the MCC.

MCC’s chief executive and secretary Guy Lavender in a statement said, “We are delighted to loan the Ashes Urn, a symbolic and special treasure, to State Library Victoria.” “The story of the Ashes Urn is one that captivates so many people around the world and the State Library Victoria’s exhibition is a very fitting place for its story to be told.”

Kate TorneyState Library Victoria chief executive added saying: “We are thrilled to have the chance to bring to life the wonderful stories surrounding the Ashes tradition, which of course, began here in Melbourne.”