This is an ordinary rabbit’s hole to the untrained eye – but inspects it a little closer and you’ll find it’s actually hiding a stunning secret. Because the unassuming hole is actually an entrance to a cave which is concealed less than a metre beneath a farmer’s field.

The untouched caves, in Shropshire, date back 700 years when they were used by followers of the Knights Templar – a medieval religious order that fought in the Crusades.

Photographer Michael Scott, from Birmingham, set out in search of the historical wonder after seeing a video of it online recently.

The 33-year-old said:

“I traipsed over a field to find it, but if you didn’t know it was there you would just walk right past it.

“It’s probably less than a metre underground, so it’s more into the field than under it.

“Considering how long it’s been there it’s in amazing condition, it’s like an underground temple.”

The tunnel leads to a network of walkways which are ‘completely untouched’, and you can see a font as well beautifully carved arches. Michael added the cave was quite cramped and those nearing six feet tall would have to bend down to fit in.

He said:

“I had to crouch down and once I was in it was completely silent.

“There were a few spiders in there but that was it.

“It was raining so the slope down was quite sludgy but inside the cave was bone dry.”

Knights Templar, also known as The Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ, was a Catholic military order founded in 1119. Members were highly trained fighters and went to battle in the Holy Land during the time of the Crusades.

Knights Templar were hailed for their courage during battle and thought to be the original keepers of the Turin Shroud. The order could have used the caves to hold secret meetings, or simply as a hiding place after they began to fall from favor when the Holy Land was lost.

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